They say you learn something new every day.

Posts tagged ‘ocr’

All is not lost (19/01/2012)

Support@tumblr.com were unable to retrieve the post I lost. It’s one of the first things I can think of that I’ve irrevocably lost on a computer. It’s somewhat ironic, because I’ve only just started my backup plans.

The “missing post” was about some free OCR software called tesseract. It’s not a massively important post, and I have a copy of the one key thing about it (the command line syntax) which is:

tesseract.exe FILE output -l eng

As well as, somewhat ironically, the pictures. Unlike Jeff I’ve kept the pictures but lost the text.

Here they are, showing the effect of the update. Accuracy of old version:

Old version

Accuracy of new version:

New version

However, I don’t want to talk about what’s missing.

Since I started my aim to learn something new each day, I’ve managed to write something every day. But losing this post was the first time that made me think, “oh damn, is it worth it”. It really annoyed me – perhaps more than it should.

There’s a section in Transformative Entrepreneurs where Jeffrey Harris talks about what makes people successful:

Successful entrepreneurs combine optimism, creativity, passion, courage and perseverance. They have an uncanny ability to keep going when times get tough. They have such excitement about what they are doing, and a need to prove to the rest of the world that their idea has merit and that they don’t quit.

Now, admittedly, losing one post isn’t the biggest set back in the world. It’s nothing compared to the set backs Mr Honda went through before his company became successful:

Like most other countries, Japan was hit badly by the Great Depression of the 1930s. In 1938, Soichiro Honda was still in school, when he started a little workshop, developing the concept of the piston ring.

His plan was to sell the idea to Toyota. He labored night and day, even slept in the workshop, always believing he could perfect his design and produce a worthy product. He was married by now, and pawned his wife’s jewelry for working capital.

Finally, came the day he completed his piston ring and was able to take a working sample to Toyota, only to be told that the rings did not meet their standards! Soichiro went back to school and suffered ridicule when the engineers laughed at his design.

He refused to give up. Rather than focus on his failure, he continued working towards his goal. Then, after two more years of struggle and redesign, he won a contract with Toyota.

By now, the Japanese government was gearing up for war! With the contract in hand, Soichiro Honda needed to build a factory to supply Toyota, but building materials were in short supply. Still he would not quit! He invented a new concrete-making process that enabled him to build the factory.

With the factory now built, he was ready for production, but the factory was bombed twice and steel became unavailable, too. Was this the end of the road for Honda? No!

He started collecting surplus gasoline cans discarded by US fighters – “Gifts from President Truman,” he called them, which became the new raw materials for his rebuilt manufacturing process. Finally, an earthquake destroyed the factory.

After the war, an extreme gasoline shortage forced people to walk or use bicycles. Honda built a tiny engine and attached it to his bicycle. His neighbors wanted one, and although he tried, materials could not be found and he was unable to supply the demand.

Was he ready to give up now? No! Soichiro Honda wrote to 18,000 bicycles shop owners and, in an inspiring letter, asked them to help him revitalize Japan. 5,000 responded and advanced him what little money they could to build his tiny bicycle engines. Unfortunately, the first models were too bulky to work well, so he continued to develop and adapt, until finally, the small engine ‘The Super Cub’ became a reality and was a success. With success in Japan, Honda began exporting his bicycle engines to Europe and America.

His plans were stopped by the whole world going to war and his factory was destroyed by a blooming earthquake. But he didn’t give up. I’m not sure I’m there yet. I think if an earthquake destroyed one of my projects I’d probably call that one a day, but I think this is an incredible lesson to us all.

The thing I’ve learnt today is to be successful you need to carry on even when you fail. Even if you fail ten times and then succeed, you’ve succeeded. Succeeding isn’t not failing, it’s working through all the failures to get to the success at the end.

It’s like that old joke:

“Why do I always find my keys in the last place I look?”

“Because you give up looking when you find them.”

The only way to not fail is to keep trying.

The other thing, of course, is to review your failures. They may be painful, but failure is the only thing you can learn from.

Consequently, I’ve reviewed Jeff’s list of “how to backup” again and looked at my process:

  • Don’t rely on your host or anyone else to back up your important data. Do it yourself. If you aren’t personally responsible for your own backups, they are effectively not happening.
    [I assumed queued posts were backed up. They weren’t]
  • If something really bad happens to your data, how would you recover? What’s the process? What are the hard parts of recovery? I think in the back of my mind I had false confidence about Coding Horror recovery scenarios because I kept thinking of it as mostly text. Of course, the text turned out to be the easiest part. The images, which I had thought of as a “nice to have”, were more essential than I realized and far more difficult to recover. Some argue that we shouldn’t be talking about “backups”, but recovery.
  • It’s worth revisiting your recovery process periodically to make sure it’s still alive, kicking, and fully functional. 

And I’ve got a plan to stop this happening again.

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